New Staten Island music: Rob Carey and The Headlocks celebrate CD release at Flagship
Most Golden Goose debuted this months on iTunes and will be celebrated with a live show at Flagship Brewing Co. on Nov. 8. . .

The album includes production and engineering help from experts like Grammy-Award-winning mixer Brian Vibberts and Gavin Lurssen, who worked on the legendary soundtrack for the Cohen Bros. Film "Oh Brother Where Art Thou." . . .

The band, a Staten Island mainstay at this point, changed almost entirely from its first album, "Cuckoobird," Carey said.

"In five years, it's gone from 13 to five of us," he said. "A lot of people were just coming and going."

He said the long process of producing "Most Golden Goose" and releasing it independent of a label meant there were no deadlines. The sleeve of the album states that it was "recorded patiently from April 1, 2011, until September 2013." He and his bandmates had all the time they needed to refine it.

Below a cast of players, the sleeve reads: "This album was a long, turning and sometimes wild journey for the band, filled with the most golden discoveries."

Carey wants this one to be worthy of radio play and films--and it will be. Many of the songs from this album and his solo albums will appear in the documentary film, "Building Magic," about a magician he met while hitchhiking through the southern states in his early 20s.

Though created on Staten Island's North Shore, the songs drip with the kind of bluesy rhythms that would transport one to some Georgian porch, sweet tea in hand. Though unintentional, the five bandmates take their influences from groups like Creedence Clearwater Revival, Led Zeppelin and The Doors. . . .

For this album, the band wanted to get back to the roots of rock-and-roll. Songs like "February Roses" and "(Why Don't You) Get Right" have the same booming excitement and rolling backbeat heard in early rock classics. [Read More...]
Local Noise: The Headlocks
β€œIt’s feel good music. And it’s thoughtful at the same time. It’s the kind of music that appeals to just about everyone. We play all ages shows. We play shows down in our local scene made up of 20 and 30-somethings and we play at your local old man bar. Good responses all around.” [Read More...]